Home
Council on Energy, Environment and Water Integrated | International | Independent
International Dialogue
Phasing Down HFCs: Opportunities to Converge Industry, Sustainability and Development Wins

05 Jul 2019   |   1300 - 1500 hrs (ICT)

About the Event

The Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW) is hosting an International Dialogue on Phasing Down HFCs: Opportunities to Converge Industry, Sustainability and Development Wins at the 41st Meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol in Bangkok.

The Dialogue will bring together several international stakeholders to deliberate on the drivers and challenges facing the HVAC sector and policymakers in India and other emerging economies globally. We will also discuss regulatory frameworks that are being developed and deployed as multi-pronged strategies to meet environmental commitments, development aspirations, and economic goals.

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

Venue

Dialogue
Breaking Barriers and Building Careers for Women in Sustainability

04 Jun 2019   |   1500 - 1830

Organised by CEEW | Women in Sustainability

About the Event

On the eve of World Environment Day 2019, the Women in Sustainability (WiS) Initiative at CEEW hosted a dialogue - Breaking Barriers and Building Careers for Women in Sustainability - which focused on the best practises to resolve implementation challenges in creating gender sensitive workspaces within the public policy sector. It marked the second anniversary of the Women in Sustainability initiative at CEEW.

Key Highlights

Session I: Panel discussion

Each panellist discussed their unique experiences as employees, administrators, managers, mothers, spouses, and decision-makers, and shared learnings to inspire gender parity in workspaces. Here are the key takeaways:

  • Most workplaces continue to be dominated by men because of a skewed representation of women in educational institutions and women quitting their jobs to fulfil family obligations.
  • Current work culture and policies largely cater to men. For example, networking meetings take place mostly after work, biases exist against women due to the recent MeToo movement, and maternity leave is perceived as a financial burden on the company.

Retaining women in the workforce:

  • Daily issues women face ranges from menstrual cramps to child care. Organisations need to study support systems and come up with solutions.
  • Given that many women are forced to leave the workforce right after childbirth, organisations must provide flexibility in time and place of work to help new mothers with child care, over and above the six months of maternity leave.
  • Gender neutral policies are imperative to promote equality at workplaces. For example, a company should offer parental leaves and not just maternity leaves. Policies should be in place to protect men and women alike from sexual harassment at workplaces.
  • Regular gender audits should be conducted to assess if a workplace is gender neutral and women friendly. Measurement of gender-based key performance indicators of organisations are required.
  • Workplaces should create “safe spaces” such as women's caucus for women to discuss challenges they face. In addition, regular gender sensitisation seminars and workshops must be conducted.
  • It is imperative to fight inherent biases existing in the sector by encouraging more women to participate in external meetings.
  • Women need to help each other, whether within an organisation or outside. One way of doing this is through mentorship.

Session 2: Breakout Session

At the breakthrough session, the audience was divided into smaller groups and given with three discussion themes:

  • How to address the work-life imbalance caused by cultural and professional expectations?
  • How to ensure retention of more women in the sector to address the “Hollow Middle”?
  • How to identify and address the subtle gender biases at the workplace?

The discussion between the groups focused on finding solutions to some of the pressing issues regarding enabling policies and culture to retain women in the sustainability sector. The groups were provided with context notes and discussion questions to help stimulate discussions which resulted in solutions. Here are the key highlights from the breakout session:

  • A tax incentive can be created to encourage more women job applicants
  • Women should be provided with options to relocate within an organisation
  • The performance pay component in the salary should be reduced
  • Gender sensitisation programs should be conducted for all employees
  • An organisation needs to have an enabling environment in which both men and women to share their issues.
  • Mentors and ICC members are to be sensitised and trained to create a conducive environment for both men and women
  • Encourage mentorship of young women employees during the early stages of their careers
  • Overcoming societal bias and encouraging more male employees to use childcare facilities and work from home to take care of their children will be a step in the right direction. Paternity leave policies should be equal and mandatory.
  • Job openings and descriptions should be gender neutral.
  • Mainstreaming gender-related work of an organisation across all platforms might help in creating awareness.
  • Donors should make mandatory provisions for gender mainstreaming within projects.

About Women in Sustainability

CEEW in collaboration with the United Nations launched WiS initiative in 2017. WiS hopes to expand the conversation around affirmative action to foster enabling work environments for women in sustainability and public policy. We hope that through collaborative partnerships, with like-minded individuals and institutions, this initiative can be nurtured for building a gender diverse workforce in the sustainability sector. You can read more about our work here. In the last couple of years, we have started conversations within and outside CEEW to reinforce the need for gender equality in the workplace, not just in numbers but also in the quality of involvement of women in key areas of research and implementation.

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

Key Speakers

  • Geeta Menon

    Ministry of Environment,
    Forests and Climate Change
    Government of India

  • Smita Mohanty

    PRADAN

  • Yamini Aiyar

    Centre for Policy Research

  • Rajat Kathuria

    Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations

  • Ritu Lal

    Amplus Solar

  • Kanika Chawla

    CEEW Centre for Energy Finance

  • Kangkanika Neog

    CEEW

Venue

CEEW Energy Access Dialogues
Enabling Equitable Access to Electricity

30 May 2019   |   1500 - 1700

Organised by CEEW

About the Event

CEEW Energy Access Dialogues are quarterly forums where researchers and practitioners discuss their ongoing work in energy access, deliberate on its implications, explore possibilities for collaborative work, and review immediate priorities in the energy access space.

At the second edition of the Dialogues, two aspects of electricity access were discussed: the quality of power supply in rural India; and the state of metering, billing, collection, and electricity theft in Uttar Pradesh.

Key Highlights

Session I

  • Johannes Urpelainen, Founding Director, Initiative for Sustainable Energy Policy at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies led a discussion on ‘The consequences of poor electricity service in rural India.’
  • The presentation used data from the ACCESS Survey and the ISEP-SPI 2019 data sets.
  • The study attempts to understand the correlation between duration of supply and the probability of appliance ownership. A range of energy services are assessed for this purpose: lighting, ICTs, space cooling, thermal loads, mechanical loads, refrigeration, and cooking. It assesses marginal change in the probability of appliance ownership against duration of supply.
  • Ownership of ICTs (mobile, television, etc.) and lighting is not dependent on duration of supply, as the rate of ownership of lighting and ICTs is high. There is a considerable increase in ownership of fans with increased duration of supply. Ownership of cooking appliances and refrigerators is rare, owing primarily to poor purchasing capacity and the high cost of usage.
  • Rural households in Uttar Pradesh have high appliance ownership relative to supply; whereas those in Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and West Bengal have low appliance ownership relative to supply. Poor duration of supply is a constraint for households to move to higher order appliances beyond ICTs and lighting. Although affordability of appliances such as refrigerators and air conditioners will remain a concern even if the duration were to improve.

Session II

  • Kanika Balani, Research Analyst, CEEW presented on ‘Metering, billing, collection, and electricity theft – understanding compliance and its drivers in Uttar Pradesh’s electricity sector.’
  • This study sheds light on the state of payment compliance and societal attitudes towards the same in Uttar Pradesh. It is based on secondary sources of data, interviews with DISCOM officials, and a survey of 1,800 households from rural and urban areas of the state. The focus is on the relative impacts of 'hard' and 'soft' thefts on utilities’ commercial losses, the key drivers for compliance, and the effect of centralized homogenous policymaking.
  • Almost half of all grid-connected rural households in Uttar Pradesh did not have meters. Although, most households were satisfied with the quality of electricity provided to them, 77 per cent (rural) and 40 per cent (urban) of households that were billed didn't trust the bills.
  • The level of compliance among those billed is nearly the same in rural and urban areas. Level of education and trust in utility officials were found to be factors influencing prompt payment of bills.
  • There was a great degree of heterogeneity among consumers of each of the five utilities in the state. This had not been considered while framing targets and policies. An important finding of the study was that a majority of respondents preferred no punishment or only monetary punishment for those with katiya connections.
 

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

In Pictures

Powered by flickr embed.

Venue

Conference
Energy Horizons

18 Jul 2019   |   1130 - 1900

Organised by CEEW in partnership with Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation (SSEF), Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), International Energy Agency (IEA), International Solar Alliance (ISA), Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21) and International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)

About the Event

CEEW presents Energy Horizons (EH) - a pre-eminent platform where India discusses the global energy transition. EH 2019 will be held on 18-19 July 2019 in New Delhi.

Formerly known as the CEEW RE Dialogue, EH brings together the world’s leading experts to discuss, debate, and deliberate on a forward-looking strategy to accelerate the energy transition in India and other emerging economies around the world.

Purpose

  • Be the platform for stakeholders from across nations and sectors to discuss issues that impact and can impact the energy transition
  • Nudge action on policy, finance, technology, and industry by showcasing opportunities and emerging solutions from India and the world
  • Highlight the urgent need for increasing the flow and affordability of private capital into clean energy markets in emerging economies and present solutions to address it
  • Provide a platform for researchers to showcase solutions based on urgent policy and technological challenges affecting the energy transition

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

Venue

Dialogue
CEF Dialogues

24 May 2019   |   1600 - 1800

Organised by Centre for Energy Finance at CEEW

About the Event

The Centre for Energy Finance at CEEW is organising a series of Dialogues over the course of the coming weeks to discuss and deliberate on urgent interventions required to overcome challenges impeding the growth of the renewable energy sector. The recommendations collated from these roundtables will be submitted to the new government in June 2019.

Industry leaders will be invited to share presentations on the assigned topic followed by a detailed discussion every Friday of May (starting 10 May 2019) from 4 to 6 pm.

Edition Date Focus area Discussion topic
1 10-May-19 Finance Affordability and accessibility of capital – dealing with
risk variables and their premiums 
2 17-May-19 Infrastructure Transmission network, land availability 
3 24-May-19 Manufacturing Domestic procurement, CAPEX support, BIS, ALMM
4 31-May-19 New Technology EV, storage, floating solar 

*Limited seats. Please register your expression of interest. A confirmation will be sent to you.

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

Venue

Roundtable
Governing Solar Radiation Management: The Role of Developing Countries

10 Apr 2019   |   1000 - 1330 hours

Organised by CEEW and Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment

About the Event

The roundtable discussion aimed to disseminate findings of the academic working group on Solar Radiation Management (SRM) and discuss the current knowledge of the technology as well as associated governance needs. Through in-depth discussions led by global experts, academics, and key government officials, the discussion sought to consider and propose actionable recommendations for SRM governance in developing countries.

Key Highlights

  • The Roundtable marked the launch of the report ‘Governing Solar Radiation Management - A report from the Academic Working Group on Climate Engineering Governance’ in India. The report can be accessed here.
  • While India is on track to meet its NDCs, research over Solar Radiation Management (SRM) is gaining importance. This growing conversation about SRM research and its potential integration into domestic and internal climate policy makes it an ideal time to give due attention to these technologies.

Actionable Recommendations for Governing SRM

  • Create politically legitimate deliberative bodies
    • Establish a global body on SRM, such as the United Nations,
    • Create a global forum for stakeholder dialogue
  • Leverage existing institutions
    • Strengthen cooperation between international organisations
    • Assess and improve capacities for regional coordination and conflict resolution
    • Continue ongoing assessment role for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
    • Develop foresight capacities in decision-making systems
  • Make research transparent and accountable
    • Report SRM research and development in global stocktake under the Paris Agreement
    • Institutionalize codes of conduct for SRM research
    • Ensure research includes international and interdisciplinary collaborations
    • Clarify funding streams
    • Develop a publicly accessible clearinghouse
    • Develop best practices for risk assessment

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

In Pictures

Powered by flickr embed.

Venue

Workshop
Role of Government Support and Market-Based Financing in India's Clean Energy Transition

27 Mar 2019   |   0930 – 1430 hours

Organised by CEEW and International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)

About the Event

The workshop, in collaboration with the International Institute for Sustainable Development, will bring together stakeholders across India to deliberate on how the interventions affecting costs and prices in the energy sector – subsidies, taxes, regulation, and financing options – impact India’s energy transition to a higher share of renewable energy and decreased overall emissions intensity. At the workshop, new data on subsidies will be presented in the context of overall government support offered to various fossil fuels and renewable sources.

The workshop aims to provide a platform for experts and policymakers from across various sectors to exchange their ideas, views and, data to make informed decisions going forward.

Key Highlights

Session I: Key issue areas for energy subsidies in 2019

  • A large chunk of India’s energy subsidies aims to keep prices low for consumers or to connect households with modern energy sources. While energy access is a priority for the Government of India, the schemes need to be better targeted.
  • Today, 93% of Indian household have access to clean cooking energy. About INR 12,800 crore of cumulative subsidies have been disbursed under the Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana (PMUY) till date.
  • These subsidies will have to continue until people completely transition to using clean cooking fuel.
  • Taxation reforms in the pricing of electricity are required to bring it under the ambit of GST.
  • When discussing support and level playing field for different energy sources, it is important to look at taxation on these energy sources in addition to subsidies.
  • Since the subsidy policy in India is not a purely techno-economic process, a political angle needs to be considered to understand the rationale behind providing subsidies.
  • Coal sector is a significant contributor to jobs in India. Subsidies to both coal and renewable energy need to be assessed in the light of employment it helps create in these sectors.

Session II: Financing India’s new energy system

  • Investors must not only look at the green credentials of the project but also consider other factors under the wider ambit of Environmental Social Governance (ESG). ESG must be factored into the rating itself.
  • Robust reporting standards for green bonds are required and the costs associated with it need to be addressed.
  • The Government of India should ensure that project developers make the techno-economic data publicly available in order to ease the decision-making process of the investors.
  • Credit rating agencies need to re-calibrate their rating methodology. Current credit rating does not accurately capture the lower risk associated with clean energy projects as compared to thermal power projects.
  • Credit ratings need to factor in climate risks for their projects.

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

In Pictures

Powered by flickr embed.

Key Speakers

  • Ashutosh Jindal

    Joint Secretary
    Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MoPNG), Government of India

  • Rahul Tongia

    Fellow
    Brookings India

  • Rohit Chandra

    Independent Researcher – Coal

  • Sacchidananda Mukherjee

    National Institute of Public Finance and Policy
    (NIPFP)

  • Gagan Sidhu

    Senior Independent Adviser (Renewable Energy)

  • Karthik Ganesan

    Research Fellow
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

  • Christopher Beaton

    Senior Policy Advisor and Lead
    International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)

  • Abhinav Soman

    Programme Associate
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

  • Kanika Chawla

    Senior Programme Lead
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

Venue

CEEW Centre for Energy Finance

CEEW Centre for Energy Finance

The CEEW Centre for Energy Finance (CEF) acts as a non-partisan market observer and driver, to monitor, develop, test, and deploy financial solutions to advance the energy transition. It aims to help deepen markets, increase transparency, and attract capital in clean energy sectors in emerging economies. It will achieve this by comprehensively tracking, interpreting, and responding to developments in the energy markets, while also bridging gaps between governments, industry, and financiers. CEF is an initiative of the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW), one of South Asia’s leading think-tanks.

Responding to a growing need for enabling an efficient and timely energy transition in emerging economies, CEF will focus on developing fit for purpose market responsive financial products. A robust energy transition also requires deep markets, which need continuous monitoring, support, and course correction. By designing financial solutions and providing near-real-time analysis of current and emerging clean energy markets, CEF will build confidence and coherence across key actors, reduce information asymmetry, and bridge the financial gap.

Financing the energy transition in emerging economies

The clean energy transition is gaining momentum across the world with cumulative renewable energy installation crossing 1000 GW in 2018. Several emerging markets are now seeing renewable energy markets of significant scale. However, these markets are young and prone to challenges that could inhibit or reverse the advances made in the recent past. Also, the absence of well-functioning markets in emerging economies make investment in clean technologies risky and prevent capital from flowing from where it is in surplus to regions where it is most needed. CEF will address the urgent need for increasing the flow and affordability of private capital into clean energy markets in emerging economies.

CEF’s Focus: Analysis and Solutions

CEF has a twin focus on markets and solutions. CEF’s market analysis will cover energy transition-related sectors, both on the supply (solar, wind, energy storage) and demand side (electric vehicles, distributed renewable energy applications). It will create open source data sets, salient and timely analysis, and market trend studies.

CEF’s solution-focused work will enable the flow of new and more affordable capital into clean energy sectors. These solutions will be designed to address specific market risks that act as roadblocks to capital flows. These will include designing, implementation support, and evaluation of policy instruments, insurance products, incubation funds, etc.

For more information, visit cef.ceew.in

Sign up for latest updates on our CEEW Centre for Energy Finance research

Our CEEW Centre for Energy Finance Team

Comments

Dialogue
On Air: Pathways to Achieving India’s Ambient Air Quality Standards

29 Mar 2019   |   1500 – 1830 hours

Organised by CEEW and International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

About the Event

The inaugural edition of the dialogue On Air, organised in collaboration with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, will focus on pathways to achieving India’s ambient air quality standards. Held bi-annually, the dialogue On Air, will feature conversations with scientists, policymakers, researchers, civil society experts, communication specialists, journalists, and on-ground actors supporting India’s transition towards cleaner air.

Cleaning our air requires simultaneous policy efforts across several different sectors. Indian authorities have implemented several measures to address pollution over the last few years. Yet, these measures may not be enough for India to achieve its National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in the coming years.

The dialogue will also include views from on-ground actors and high-level experts on crop-residue burning and emissions inventories.

Key Findings from the Four Studies

  • About 674 million citizens are likely to breathe air with high concentrations of PM 2.5 in 2030, even if India were to comply with its existing pollution control policies and regulations.
  • Aligning sustainable development policies with implementation of advanced emission control technologies could provide NAAQS-compliant air quality to about 85 per cent of the Indian population.
  • Despite multiple source apportionment studies specific to Delhi NCR, policymakers can’t design an effective action plan due to varying estimates. A synthesis of studies finds having common guidelines, quantification of uncertainties as well as greater data transparency might help in designing more effective action plans.
  • Farmers in Punjab are keen to break away from the wheat-paddy cycle. Interventions such as Happy Seeder could be more successful if distribution were improved, new business models were deployed, and subsidies were better targeted. In addition, deploying low-cost pollution sensors in rural areas could help with tracking mitigation policy effectiveness.

Read the CEEW-IIASA report on Pathways to Achieve National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in India, our brief on What is Polluting Delhi’s Air?, Paddy Residue Burning in Punjab and Alternative Methods to Monitor Air Pollution.

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

In Pictures

Powered by flickr embed.

Key Speakers

  • Jamshyd Godrej

    Chairperson
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

  • Dr Pallav Purohit

    Research Scholar, Air Quality & Greenhouse Gases
    International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

  • Dr Markus Amann

    Program Director, Air Quality & Greenhouse Gases
    International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

  • Krishan Dhawan

    CEO
    Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation (SSEF)

  • Dr Deepanjali Majumdar

    Scientist
    National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI)

  • Pallavi Pant

    Staff Scientist
    Health Effects Institute, Boston

  • Dr Hem H. Dholakia

    Senior Research Associate
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

  • Ishita Jalan

    Research Analyst
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

  • Dr Arunabha Ghosh

    CEO
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

  • Karthik Ganesan

    Research Fellow
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

  • Kurinji L. S.

    Research Analyst
    Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

Venue

Session
Smart City Water Distribution

14 Mar 2019   |   1130 – 1745

Organised by India Smart Grid Forum and CEEW

At this session at India Smart Utility Week, we aim to highlight the challenges in water management, in securing clean and safe water supply, and the digitalisation of water assets. The session organised by India Smart Grid Forum and CEEW will bring together the leading water utilities, municipalities, policymakers, regulators, investors, industry experts, and researchers to discuss market trends, share best practices, and showcase new smart water technologies

For Event Queries

Riddhima Sethi

Communications Associate

riddhima.sethi@ceew.in

Venue

Pages